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besides sight

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Black temmoku sake cup

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touch and fondle it in your hands

use and use it in your everyday life

take your time with the senses for it

that's the way it is

 

 

 


Early Karatsu tea bowl

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On The Board

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Katsuo-no-Tataki (Lightly Roasted Bonito) on Toban


 

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Kohai

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Remains of Kohai (Halo)

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Halo found on Buddhist images, representing light said to be emitted by the Buddha *gokou 後光. In sculpture, a wooden or metal kouhai was attached to the back of the figure, sometimes decorated in openwork *sukashibori 透彫. Kouhai were used in Japan from the Asuka period, usually made of bronze or gilt bronze, and were named according to their shape and design. One of the earliest examples is the halo on the Shaka sanzonzou 釈迦三尊像 (623) in Houryuuji 法隆寺, which is known as ikkou sanzon kouhai 一光三尊光背 (the single-light triad halo, see *ikkou sanon 一光三尊), because all three figures of the triad are enclosed in a single halo. The halo surrounds the figures completely *kyoshinkou 挙身光 and has a pointed top, giving it the name *funagata kouhai 舟形光背 (the boat-shaped halo). Individual standing figures of the same period had round halos *enkou 円光 as on the Four Heavenly Kings, Shitennou 四天王 in Houryuuji *Kondou 法隆寺金堂, or jewel-shaped halos *houjugata kouhai 宝珠形光背, like that of the Kudara Kannonzou 百済観音像 in Houryuuji Daihouzouden 法隆寺大宝蔵殿. In the Tenpyou period, the double-round halo *nijuu-enkou 二重円光 became popular. A round head-nimbus *zukou 頭光 is attached to a round body-nimbus *shinkou 身光, as on the Miroku Bosatsu 弥勒菩薩 in Houryuuji Daihouzouden 法隆寺大宝蔵殿. Halos decorated with Chinese foliage design *karakusamon 唐草文 and a thousand miniature buddhas senbutsu kouhai 千仏光背 were also produced in the Tenpyou period. A good example is the Rushanabutsu 盧舎那仏 (779) in Toushoudaiji 唐招堤寺, Nara. In the Heian period halos with a decorated base *koukyaku 光脚 became popular. *Ten 天 and *Myouou 明王 figures had halos with flame designs *kaen kouhai 火焔光背. The earlist examples of wooden halos *itakouhai 板光背 date from the late 9c, and these were often painted with flames, karakusamon, and small manifestations of buddha *kebutsu 化仏, as on the Shaka ryuuzou 釈迦立像 in Murouji 室生寺, Nara. In the 12c nijuu enkou were surrounded by a large outer boat-shaped halo of openwork flying asparas figures *hiten kouhai 飛天光背. The model for this style was the Amida Nyoraizazou 阿弥陀如来坐像 (1053) by Jouchou 定朝 in Byoudouin 平等院, Kyoto. Other styles characteristic of the late Heian period were the single free-standing ring *rinkou 輪光 like that of the *Kichijouten 吉祥天 in Joururiji 浄瑠璃寺, Kyoto, a halo with radiating spokes like a wheel, houshagata kouhai 放射形光背, seen on the Amida Nyoraizou in Kanzeonji 観世音寺, Fukuoka prefecture; and the *mibu kouhai 壬生光背 named after the Jizou Bosatsu 地蔵菩薩 in Mibudera 壬生寺, Kyoto (now lost). In the Kamakura period various designs of kouhai with openwork decoration continued to be produced, as well as halos decorated with small figures representings the followers of Buddha *kenzoku 眷属, as on the central Senju Kannon 千手観音 in Rengeouin 蓮華王院, Kyoto. Another form of halo called *ensoukou 円相光 enclosed the nijuu ensou in a large outer circle, often seen on Aizen Myouou 愛染明王 figures (1247), for example in Saidaiji 西大寺, Nara.

(Quated from: http://www.aisf.or.jp/~jaanus/deta/k/kouhai2.htm)

 

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Mizuhiki

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Description:  

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Mizuhiki plays an important role in Japanese culture as a symbol of affection, warmth, and togetherness. Made from washi, or Japanese paper, Mizuhiki is a colorful twine that is tied in knots to decorate gifts. Each knot has a meaning and is used for a specific event (wedding ceremony, funeral service, birth, visiting someone at the hospital, etc.). Mizuhiki knots are closely associated with the Japanese word musubo (meaning "connection" or "tying") because tying a Mizuhiki knot connects people and ties them together.

History of Mizuhiki: In 607 AD, a Japanese delegate returned from China with a gift for the Japanese emperor. The gift was decorated with a red and white twine knot symbolizing "safe journey" for the delegate. The Japanese began recreating the knot from washi, starting a tradition of presenting a gift box with a twine or Mizuhiki knot.

 

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Quated from: http://blog.makezine.com/projects/mizuhiki-knot/

 

 

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Sarumawashi

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Shugendo

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GYOJA

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Shugendō (修験道?) is a highly syncretic Buddhist religion or sect and mystical-spiritual tradition that originated in pre-Feudal Japan, in which enlightenment is equated with attaining oneness with the kami (?). This perception of experiential "awakening" is obtained through the understanding of the relationship between humanity and nature, centered on an ascetic, mountain-dwelling practice. The focus or goal of Shugendō is the development of spiritual experience and power. Having backgrounds in mountain worship, Shugendō incorporated beliefs or philosophies from Old Shinto[citation needed] as well as folk animism, and further developed as Taoism and esoteric Buddhism arrived in Japan. The 7th century ascetic and mystic En no Gyōja is often considered as having first organized Shugendō as a doctrine. Shugendō literally means "the path of training and testing"[citation needed] or "the way to spiritual power through discipline."[1]

Contents

History

With its origins in the solitary hijiri back in the 7th century, shugendō evolved as a sort of amalgamation between Vajrayana, Shinto, and several other religious influences including Taoism. Buddhism and Shinto were amalgamated in the shinbutsu shūgō, and Kūkai's syncretic view held wide sway up until the end of the Edo period, coexisting with Shinto elements within shugendō.[2]

In 1613 during the Edo period, the Tokugawa Shogunate issued a regulation obliging shugendō temples to either belong to Shingon or Tendai temples.

During the Meiji Restoration, when Shinto was declared an independent state religion separate from Buddhism, shugendō was banned as a superstition not fit for a new, enlightened Japan. Some shugendō temples converted themselves into various officially approved Shintō denominations.

In modern times, shugendō is practiced mainly by Tendai and Shingon sects, retaining an influence on modern Japanese religion and culture. Some temples include: Kinpusen-ji in Yoshino (Tendai), Ideha Shrine in Dewa Sanzan, Daigo-ji in Kyoto (Shingon).

Followers

Those who practice shugendō are referred to in two ways. One term, shugenja (修験者), is derived from the term shugendō, literally meaning "a person of training and testing", i.e. "a person of shugen." The other term, yamabushi (山伏), means "one who lies in the mountains". Supernatural creatures often appeared as yamabushi in Japanese myths and folklore, as is evident in tales of the legendary warrior monk Saitō Musashibō Benkei and the deity Sōjōbō, king of the tengu (mountain spirits). Shugendō practitioners are the most direct lineage descendants of the ancient Kōya Hijiri monks of the eight and ninth centuries.[3]

Modern shugenja in Japan and throughout the World are known to self-actualize their spiritual power in experiential form through challenging and rigorous ritualistic tests of courage and devotion known as shugyō. Pilgrimages involving mountain treks are embarked upon by shugenja and, through the experience of each trek, as well as years of study, "rank" is earned within the sect. The rituals are kept secret from the neophyte shugenja and the World at large. This denju ensures the true faith of the neophytes and maintains the fear of the unknown as they embark upon the austere journey. This secrecy was also borne out of previous episodes of persecution and oppression of shugenja as a threat to the ruling military hegemony. Many modern shugenja maintain the practice of relative anonymity in their daily lives.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ Picken, Stuart D.B. (1994). Essentials of Shinto: An Analytical Guide to Principal Teachings. Westport, CT, USA: Greenwood Press. p. 199. ISBN 0-313-26431-7.
  2. ^ Miyake, Hitoshi. Shugendo in History. pp45-52.
  3. ^ Blacker, Carmen (1999). The Catalpa Bow. UK: Japan Library. pp. 165-167. ISBN 1-873410-85-9.
  • Miyake, Hitoshi. The Mandala of the Mountain: Shugendō and Folk Religion. Tokyo: Keio University Press, 2005. ISBN 978-4-7664-1128-7.

  • McMullen, James P.; Kornicki, Peter F. (1996). Religion in Japan: arrows to heaven and earth. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 120-121. ISBN 0-521-55028-9.

Further reading

Gill, Andrea K. (2012) "Shugendō: Pilgrimage and Ritual in a Japanese Folk Religion," Pursuit - The Journal of Undergraduate Research at the University of Tennessee: Vol. 3: Iss. 2, Article 4. Available at: http://trace.tennessee.edu/pursuit/vol3/iss2/4

External links

 

Shugendô Now from Jean-Marc Abela on Vimeo.

 

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E-Seto Plate

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"~ antique Pictured Seto (E-Seto) plate designed with a scene of "Crane and Tortoise" (symbol of longevity, artistic motif), ~" <More Description>

 

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Seto Shikigawara

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"~ antique Japanese Seto-made square pottery tile (Shikigawara) engraved with the traditional arabesque pattern (Karakusa), covered with mature darkened green-glaze of Oribe style, ~" <More Description>

 

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Fish Yokogi

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"~ antique wooden adjustable fish-shaped lock (Yokogi) of pothook (Jizaikagi) for Japanese traditional hearth (Irori), dated back to Edo period, ~" <More Description>

 

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Buddha Head of Sukohthai

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"~ Sukhothai-excavated bronze Buddha head, circa 13-14th century, ~" <More Description>

 

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Bronze Brush Holder Of Flying Dragons

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"~ Japanese bronze brush holder of openwork of flying dragons in rich patina, dated back to Edo period, ~" <More Description>

 

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Tobacco set of Tsugaru

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"~ antique Japanese tobacco set of Kiseru bamboo pipe with geometrically carved silver mouth piece and bowl, its pipe case and its pouch woven by koyori paper string finished with lacquer-coating, and chochin lantern-shaped string clip adjusting in the between, as a traditional Tsugaru-made (Western region of Aomori Prefecture), ~" <More Description>

 

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A pair of Daruma braziers

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"~ a pair of antique Japanese pottery potbellied (simplified Bodhidharma-shaped) Hibachi braziers for warming the hands ("Daruma-gata shuro (teaburi)"), designed to be filled with mature iron-glazed chrysanthemum as a pop but calm scenery, ~" <More Description>

 

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Blue and white vessel of Choson

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"~ antique Korean eleven-faceted (mentori) blue and white porcelain vessel of the latter term of Joseon (Choson) Dynasty, ~" <More Description>

 

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Negoro tray

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"Sophisticated quality traditional Negoro lacquered wooden square tray with foot (Sumikiri-bon) in the elegant mature Japanese red scenery with modest appearance of undercoated black lacquer, used for the individual meal in temple and handed down for the occasions like tea ceremony or etc., dates back to Edo period, circa 19th century or earlier, ~" <More Description>

 

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Buddhist Bronze Bell

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"Fine antique cast bronze bell for Buddhist-use, called Kansho (also, Hansho, Shosho, Bochiyon, Kenchi), ~" <More Description>

 

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Tea ceremony sword

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"~ antique lacquered wooden sword for the use of tea ceremony room, so-called Chato ("Tea sword"), Edo period, early-mid 19th century, ~" <More Description>

 

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A Pair of Iron Shishi

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"A pair of impressive Japanese iron lion-dogs (Shishi) with full of patina by its mature copper-alloy surface, ~" <More Description>

 

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